Should You Cut Up Your Credit Cards?

If you are desperate to reduce your unnecessary spending and pay off your debt, you may be looking for a quick solution to turn your life around. I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but it isn’t easy to turn your life around. While I strive to offer you great advice on how to be debt free, it’s hard to make the change. It isn’t as easy as turning a light switch on and off. If you have a problem with spending too much, you may have a mild addiction. Turning this off isn’t easy.

Should You Cut Up Your Credit Card?

credit card

One of the ways that people struggle in controlling their spending is with the use of their credit cards.

Do you go crazy when you use your credit card?

Is it difficult to understand what it will cost you when you swipe the card?

Part of the difficulty in managing your credit card spending may be that it is hard to realize the cost. An item that costs $400 takes the same number of swipes at a cashier as does a $4 gallon of milk. Our mind associate the cost of things by what we have to give up. If understanding the digital balance or cost is difficult to grasp, you may want to go cold turkey and cut up your credit cards. It’s never going to be easy, but at least this way you will be able to feel the difference between big purchase.

Should You Freeze Your Credit Card?

An alternative to cutting up your credit cards is to freeze them. The idea is that by freezing your credit cards, you will be able to resist the splurges – the purchases that are initiated by the “need” for something right then and now. You convince yourself that you can’t wait or perhaps if you do wait, you will miss out on this deal so you might as well buy it now.

Freezing your credit card can be a viable option, but you need to make sure if it is right for you.

Do you buy things without thinking them through?

Do you ask yourself whether you NEED this or that before swiping the card?

Do you need more accountability?

 

Learning to manage your spending and live debt free is not going to be easy. It takes time to change your habits. The difference between being limited by your debt and being debt free may just be learning to control your spending. You don’t necessarily have to go to the two extremes mentioned above – it all depends on you. Take time to determine whether you can get a hold of your spending without going to the extremes. The most important advice is that you have to learn what is necessary for you.

Photo credit: dno1967b via Flickr

Photo credit: paalia via Flickr

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